True Locavore Eating: Community Supported Agriculture

Do you already shop at your local farmers market? Joining a Community Supporte Agriculture (CSA) program just takes your organic, local eating up a notch.

When you join a CSA program, you support a local farm by paying a set fee at the beginning of the growing season. Then, throughout the season you receive a bag full o fresh fruits and veggies (usually the best of the crop) each week. Not too shabby, huh?

Joining a CSA

This spring season I joined a CSA program for the first time, and I absolutely love it. Every Saturday I bring my reusable bag to my local farmers market and the farmer stuffs it full of that week’s freshest, in-season fruits, vegetables and herbs (organic, of course!)

Because I paid the fee for the CSA program back in February, it feels a bit like I’m getting the food for free (even though I know that’s not true!) Still, when I compare prices to what I would be purchasing the items for at the farmers market, it’s competitive. And, I’m trying foods I would never normally grab off the farmers market table.

In just the five weeks since the program started, I’ve already sautéed Swiss chard for the first time, potted a tiny lavender plant that came ready to flourish, tasted scrumptious heirloom tomatoes and made salads from the freshest lettuce I’ve ever eaten—all from my CSA program!

Meet Peacock Farms

The local farm I support, which is located in Higginsville, Missouri, is called Peacock Farms. Started by the current farmer’s great grandfather, Peacock Farms has been in Betty Mendenhall’s family since 1868. The farm is named after her family name, Peacock.


[Betty Mendenhall, owner of Peacock Farms, tends to her plants. Image courtesy Peacock Farms]

Mendenhall’s great grandfather’s main crop was hemp, but he also grew corn, oats, wheat and alfalfa. When her aunt took over the farm, she turned the land to pasture and raised cattle. So, when the farm was handed down to Mendenhall and her husband, they basically had virgin soil to work with.

“This fit perfectly with my plan to keep the land as chemical-free as possible,” Mendenhall said on her website. “My husband does row crops, then I have my portion to grow vegetables and fruit. We raise registered Angus cattle, chicken, peacocks, and two donkeys.”

My Farmers Market

Every weekend I pick up my bag of produce at the farmers market held in City Market, an open air market located in the Rivermarket, an old area of Kansas City, Missouri.

[City Market, an open air market with shops, dining, entertainment and a weekend farmers market, is a favorite for Kansas City locals.]


[Fresh tomatoes for sale at the City Market farmers market.]

[Besides fresh fruits and veggies, the City Market farmers market also offers a variety of plants perfect for adding to an organic garden.]

Week To Week

Curious about what I get in my bag of organic goodies every week? Check back here for an update!

May 12
Bag lettuce
Bunch rhubarb
Bag spinach
Bunch asparagus
Bag Swiss chard
Dozen eggs
3 cloves garlic

May 19
Bag lettuce
Bunch rhubarb
Bag spinach
Bunch asparagus
Dozen eggs
Basil and lavender plants

May 26
Bag salad mix
Bunch radishes
Bunch asparagus
Bag stir fry mix
Bag Swiss chard
Dozen eggs

June 2
Bundle rhubarb
Bag stir fry mix
Bunch green onions
4 tomatoes
Bunch broccoli
Kale

June 9
Bag lettuce
Kale
2 tomatoes
Bunch asparagus
Green beans
Bunch green onions

Have you joined a CSA program in your community? Let me know how you like it in the comments section!

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